Astronomical Society of Haringey

 

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MEETINGS

UPDATED MAY 2024

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IMPORTANT

We are continuing to run the general meetings 'virtually' (usually via Zoom) as we currently lack a convenient venue to meet

NOTE - you do not need to have any of the usual programs, Skype, Teams or Zoom, actually installed on you computer - you are sent a URL (website link) and you just run that in your browser of choice

 

The day for all meetings is generally the third Thursday of the relevant month
But there are the occasional changes, so it is always advisable to double-check the dates below

Correct up until press day, these dates will also be found in the magazine and mentioned on Facebook

Doors open - 7.30pm : Main speaker - 8.00pm. Finish - 10.00pm

Virtual Meetings are current starting at 7.00pm, running until 9.00pm

Meetings directly below are from 2024, back to 2017
Meetings from 2016 back - see below

Note that the NEXT meeting is always at the top of the list
(Previous meetings move to the bottom of the relevant year)

Clicking on photos where relevant (when you hover the mouse, the border will change colour) will bring up other websites or Facebook pages.

 

 

2024

THIS WILL BE A VIRTUAL MEETING via Zoom]
19.00hrs / 7.00pm

Island Zero
A practical way to begin space habitat development

The overall subject is Space Habitats or Space Colonies, which were popularised back in the 1970s to house thousands of people in space.
Jerry ran the ‘SPACE’ Project at the BIS - Study Project Advancing Colony Engineering - to update the 1970s design of the spherical "Island One" colony.
As part of this, they developed the concept of a small-scale structure that would act as a living and working space for the construction team. This was designated "Island Zero". 

Island Zero would be constructed from inflatable modules and rotate to produce simulated gravity. An initial version would be needed in order to carry out the medical research needed to determine what g-level should be used.
Importantly, this isn't something for decades ago come - inflatable units have already been launched - right - and the cost of launching is continuing to fall, so given a go-ahead an initial structure could be installed within a couple of years! Jerry will explain  a lot more during his talk.

BEAM

The Bigalow Expandable Activity Module attached to the ISS
Photo : NASA

THIS WILL BE A VIRTUAL MEETING [ZOOM]
19.00hrs / 7.00pm

This will be a report on the Total Solar Eclipse that passes over Mexico, the US and Canada on 8th April

Solar Eclipse

Observing Evening

 

Observing evening run by Secretary Alister Innes at the usual location - Brunswick Park, Osidge Lane, Barnet.

Meeting at 18.00hrs / 6.00pm NOTE ONE HOUR EARLIER THAN USUAL

NOTE we continue to hold Observing Evenings on the FRIDAY of the relevant week
as it's likely better for the weekend!

The temperatures have been above the average, but still wrap up warm!

See OBSERVING for the map and details

Observing Evening

 

cancelled due to weather conditions

 

 

Observing Evening

 

Observing evening run by Secretary Alister Innes at the usual location - Brunswick Park, Osidge Lane, Barnet.

Meeting at 19.00hrs / 7.0opm

NOTE this is Friday, which has been the day for the previous few Observing Evenings.
Besides it's likely better for the weekend, this is more down to the fact that the weather forecast is slightly better for Friday!

Remember to wrap up warm!

See OBSERVING for the map and details

THIS WILL BE A VIRTUAL MEETING [ZOOM]
19.00hrs / 7.00pm

FROM SYLVESTER McCOY TO PASTURES NEW

[The Ages of Who - Part 3]

The end of the original run of Doctor Who, generally called ‘Classic Who’, was in 1989 and featured Sylvester McCoy as the seventh incarnation of the Doctor. Dale’s latest review of the continuing saga, looks at this era, and onto the somewhat barren ‘in between’ years that lasted from 1989 until the New Millennium. But in-between did come the infamous movie - American driven - behind which was the premise that it would kick-start Who much earlier?  Dale consequently runs on from 1989 and examines the time an incarnation of a Doctor who (sorry) only appeared, for all practical purposes, once, though gained the number 8. He then travels forward in time to the appearance of long-time fan Russell T. Davis as show runner, and his reincarnation of the whole idea. This consequently involved a reincarnation of ‘The Doctor’, now in the form of Christopher Ecclestone as Doctor Number 9. And you never know the story may even run into Doctor Number 10… Tardis

OBSERVING EVENING
BRUNSWICK PARK, OSIDGE LANE, BARNET, EN4 8JT

17th February 2023

OBSERVING EVENING
BRUNSWICK PARK, OSIDGE LANE, BARNET, EN4 8JT

17th March 2023

!!! REMEMBER THIS IS FRIDAY !!!

Ideally arrive slightly before 7:00pm so that you can start setting up while it is still light       
Drop your kit off at the gate and then park on the marked line shown on the map  
It is still cold at night - so wear something warm  

The Moon is near new, so with the skies clear, should make for good viewing -  assuming no cloud cover!
If the weather is bad and we cannot observe, we can retire to The Osidge Arms (see map) 
for a virtual observing meeting
click on map for a larger verison

Observing Map - small

OBSERVING EVENING
BRUNSWICK PARK, OSIDGE LANE, BARNET, EN4 8JT

17th March 2023

THIS WILL BE A VIRTUAL MEETING [ZOOM]
19.00hrs / 7.00pm

PECULIAR GALAXIES

The Universe - as we view it from our insignificant location, way out on one of the sprial arms of our own galalxie, The Milky Way - is populated by many, many other galaxies - as far as the eye - or these days very powerful telescopes with sophisticated digital light-collecting capabilities - can see

Many of these have very strange shapes, and invariably acquire nick-names.

ASH Chairman, Jim Webb, takes us on journey of some of the most 'Peculiar' of these Galaxies

Image - the Antennae Galaxies - two colliding galaxies, with the NGC numbers - NGC 4038 (top) and NGC 4039 (bottom). They are located in the consellation Corvus (the Crow) : NASA/ESA

mm
THIS WILL BE A VIRTUAL MEETING [ZOOM]
19.00hrs / 7.00pm

Deep Skies : The Space Sites of the Southwestern States

The skies of the southwestern states of the USA are wide and open, and the area is home to many 'space sites'. These include optical observatories, radio observatories, rocket launch sites, museums, oh, and a possible crash site of an alien spaceship... Based on an original talk, this has been updated.

Crashsite

SUMMER BREAK

Summer Break

Cancelled due to techical problems and unforeseen circumstantances

THIS WILL BE A VIRTUAL MEETING [ZOOM]
19.00hrs / 7.00pm

MAT -23 (or "Mat's Astro Tours - 2023")

ASH Editor, Mat Irvine, contunes his semi-regular look at the astronomical and space sites in the USA with a talk on his visit in October.

This was based around the Annular Solar Eclipse (see GALLERY), but included other places such as Spaceport America, the Very Large Array (right) and the Nuclear Museum in Albuquerque

photos - Mat Irvine

VLA
jodrell Jodrell Bank Mk 1A in the snow - photo - Mat Irvine

THIS WILL BE A VIRTUAL MEETING [ZOOM]
19.00hrs / 7.00pm

PICS IN SPACE

ASH Chairman Jim Webb looks at the way space imaging has changed over the years, from ground-based telescopes, through to larger and larger telescopes being placed in orbit. This has recently culminated with the largest such observatory so far being orbited, the James Webb Space Telescope (No relation to the Chairman!)

JWST

THIS WILL BE A VIRTUAL MEETING [SKYPE]
19.00hrs / 7.00pm

small talk

It's been almost 10 years since our last Small Talk, (October 2012), so newer members may wonder what this is all about?
It originally came about as we found some members had enough information for a - literally - small talk, but not enough for a full meeting. So we put them all together and allowed them to speak for, well, a small length of time, (the exact length didn't really matter). Sometimes we did a meeting with just two speakers, and there was at least one where five spoke. It can also generate some healthy debate.

Above - as an example - the January 2005 small talk, which had the five speakers -
l-r - Gary Marriott, Charles Towler, Michael Franks, Mike Roberts and Mat Irvine,
- and the topics...(again l-r) first pictures from Huygens; Transit of Venus; Highest point in the Canaries - Mount Teide; the Meade ETX105 telescope; and Blake's 7....

Pyramids

THIS WILL BE A
VIRTUAL MEETING [ZOOM]
19.00hrs / 7.00pm


THE AGES OF WHO
Part 2
BAKER TO BAKER

Dale Baker continues his look at the actors who have played Doctor Who over the years

This time almost a 'Bakers Dozen' (well three anyway) with Dale (Baker #1) looking at Tom Baker #2, to Colin Baker, #3, not forgetting of course, Peter Davison in between

OBSERVING EVENING
BRUNSWICK PARK, OSIDGE LANE, BARNET

Ideally arrive about 7:30pm so that you can start setting up while it is still light 

Alister and I will be there to greet you.
Drop your kit off at the gate and then park on the marked line shown on the map  
It could be a coldish evening so wear something warm  
If the weather is bad and we cannot observe, we can retire The Osidge Arms (see map) 
for a virtual observing meeting
Jim Webb, Chair
click on map for a larger verison

Observing Map - small

THIS WILL BE A VIRTUAL MEETING [ZOOM]
19.00hrs / 7.00pm

EXPLORING THE HIGHLANDS OF THE MOON
Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Apollo 16


Apollo 16 was the second of the “J” missions, where the scientific content was increased by both the extended time on the Moon and the inclusion of a Lunar Roving Vehicle, which allowed the astronauts to cover a much greater area of the lunar surface.
Apollo 16's landing almost didn't happen, due to a problem with the Service Module’s main engine and the rules regarding astronaut safety. However, this was overcome.
The landing site in the Descartes Highlands offered dramatic views with mountains and large rocks. Viewers back on Earth were able to follow the activities of John Young, making his fourth spaceflight, and Charlie Duke, the youngest person to walk on the Moon.
Apollo 16 was also the only mission to put a telescope on the Moon – designed to operate in ultra-violet light – and it also included the Lunar Olympics and a Grand Prix!
Apollo 16 LRV



Since 2018 he has been giving a series of presentations at the British Interplanetary Society celebrating the 50th anniversary of each one of the Apollo flights. He has also been a regular guest at ASH meetings.

THIS WILL BE A VIRTUAL MEETING [ZOOM]
19.00hrs / 7.00pm

HOW THE MILKY WAY GOT ITS ARMS

Rudyard Kipling, in the Just So Stories, tells us how the leopard got its spots and how the rhinoceros got its skin but never mentions how the Milky Way got its arms? Yet spiral galaxies, of which the Milky Way - or 'our Home Galaxy ' - is one, are one of the most common types of galaxy. Tony Sizer gives one idea as to how spiral arms might form - with a little help from sandcastles and motorways.

Tony is a member of the Orpington Astronomical Society, and was regular speaker to the Society. However this hasn't occurred for some years now, so a welcome return.

Image : Robert Hurt, IPAC; Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF

Milky Way

OBSERVING EVENING
BRUNSWICK PARK, OSIDGE LANE, BARNET

The nights are drawing in, so darker a bit earlier each evening, and a lot to see 'up there' 
The Summer Triangle, the asterism of the three bright stars Vega, Deneb and Altair are very prominent,
and you can't really miss Jupiter Ideally arrive at our traditional 'start' time - 20.00hrs/8:00pm - so that you can start setting up while it is still light
Alister will be there to greet you
Drop your gear off at the gate and then park where marked on the map  
It's getting slightly chillier in the evenings, so it is advisable to wear something warm  
If it's totally overcast or the weather is bad and we cannot observe, we can retire to The Osidge Arms (see map) 
for a virtual observing meeting Any questions email observing@ashastro.co.uk
Jim Webb, Chair
click on map for a larger verison

Observing Map - small

VIRTUAL MEETING [ZOOM] 19.00hrs / 7.00pm

IT STARTED IT WITH A BEEP

This month has a significant date in any space enthusiast's calendar - the 4th. It was on that date that the world's first artificial satellite was launched - Sputnik 1. As far as satellites in general go, it was hardly sophisticated, but it will always hold the record as 'the first'.

But everyone assumed that the Americans would get there first - so what gave the Soviet Union the advantage? Mat explains that is was basically down to the lack of technology that won, and looks back at what put the Soviets in the running for this achievement.

We do, ahem, of course have this current situation with Russia vs The Rest of the World (well most of it..), which seem highly unlikely to have been resolved by this month.

But always remember :
"The past is a foreign country... (they do things differently there...")

Stamp

VIRTUAL MEETING [ZOOM] 19.00hrs / 7.00pm

APOLLO 17 : THE LAST MEN ON THE MOON - FOR NOW!

As we start the new NASA era of crewed space exploration with Project Artemis, Jerry completes his round-up of 50 years of the Project Apollo Missions with Apollo 17.

Launched 7th December 1972, the mission lasted over 12 days until the splashdown on 19th. It carried the crew of the Commander Gene Cernan, Command Module Pilot, Ron Evans and Lunar Model Pilot, Harrison Schmitt. Schmitt was the first - and only - Apollo astronaut to be a scientist first and an astronaut second and was chosen as they needed a geologist on the Moon! He was - to date - the last person to step down onto the Lunar surface, though not the last - to date - to actually stand on the Moon, as Cernan, as Commander, was the last to leave.

Loads more of intriguing details in Jerry's talk.

Apollo 17

WINTER BREAK

But the skies are still there and although outside will be crisp and cold, it is more likely to be clear, so be sure to wrap up warm, and 'look up'

Observatory

CHRISTMAS BREAK

bbb

design and photo: mat irvine

OBSERVING EVENING
Cancelled due to the COVID 19 situation

Cancelled due to the COVID 19 situation

 

previously for 2019

The talk will be about the many problems with the prospect of living on Mars. From the lack of a protective magnetic field, poisonous atmosphere, lack of plant- growing sunlight and, (possibly the most devastating), the complete lack of pubs. Permanent occupation of Mars by humans may not be a possibility...

Greg works at the Royal Observatory Greenwich presenting planetarium shows, school workshops, adult evening classes and occasionally presenting on radio and television. He also work for Astronomy Now magazine, creating artwork and writing articles.

He's given many lectures at various venues over the years, including the Society.

Mars Base

The Saturn Cassini probe has only a few month left - it will be steered to destruction in the Saturnian atmosphere in September 2017. It has been in space for 20 years and has been one of the most successful planetary probes ever.

Jim will be examining the legacy and what will be happening in the next few months.

Cassini-Saturn

We often assume all Society members automatically know all there is to know about telescope and viewing, but of course they may not, and anyway new members arrive, and they may not be fully knowledgeable as to 'how to get the best out of your instrument'!

So for this meeting, Observing Officers Jim Webb (right) and Alister Innes (left) will take you through the basics, including the different types of 'scopes and lenses, and of course that a good pair of binoculars are also very useful for viewing the heavens

This slightly enigmatic title refers to the fact that firstly SETI - the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence - is still alive and well, and now through BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing) anyone with spare downtime on their home computer (and most home computers are only used at 1% of their capacity) can join in the search.

Past ASH member George Emsden, who participates in the exercise, will show how it is all achieved!

No meetings these months